Voila! A high tunnel

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In the interest of making this post less long-winded, I think I’ll let the pictures save me writing (and you reading) a thousand words and just briefly outline the basic info. My dad drove in from Calgary the day after Duncan and I put up the basic frame. Dad and I then took about another 6 days to: install the polyethylene; install 2X4 supports underneath each hoop; replace the 1X2 side purlins with EMT, build removable ends, one with a door; attach purlins to the line of 2X4’s running down the centre of the tunnel; install plant shelving and a potting counter down the centre; wash the inside and outside of the polyethylene; build a secondary enclosed and propane-heated volume within the tunnel for seed germination at higher temperatures; lay down lumber wrap over the whole “floor”; and move all of our potting stuff into the tunnel. Before he left, 10 or so days after arriving, Dad also helped me build a slanted wash station, prepare another seed bed adjacent to the 13 we already used last year, and prepare the squash plot.

He must be worn out. I know I am.






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2 responses to “Voila! A high tunnel

  1. >Wow! You're like a west coast Eliot Coleman!. I like your little germination tent. Is ventilation an issue with it? Can't wait to see pictures of all the seedlings.

  2. >Kind words indeed. I call my friend Ray at Haliburton Farms the Eliot Coleman of Saanich. I'm but a copycat.I have a piece of tin roofing above the burner and below the starts to distribute heat. The burner is set at its lowest seconds lowest setting so the temps don't get very high. I think I need to reduce the volume of the tent above the plants more and make it tighter; currently there's too much ventilation. The heat, CO2 and humidity are probably all pluses but I do wonder about the fumes, once the plants are germinated. I can smell them when I open the door but it's not overpowering; in fact I'm not sure it's even the propane exhaust. Could be the lumber wrap offgassing. I don't really care if things take a little longer to germinate with cool temps. As long as the seeds don't rot and the frost intolerant plants don't die.

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